Thursday, May 24 , 2018, 9:29 pm | Overcast 58º

 
 
 
 
Captain's Log

Captain’s Log: ‘Fish Elevator’ Gets Rockfish Back Where They Belong

An improvised safe-release device tackles a surface problem and reduces the opportunity for "floaters"

It may not look like much, but Capt. David Bacon's Deep Release Device, dubbed the
It may not look like much, but Capt. David Bacon’s Deep Release Device, dubbed the “fish elevator” by passengers on his WaveWalker charter boat, is proving surprisingly effective at getting released rockfish back to where they belong. (Ramona Lisa McFadyen photo)

The word “Barotrauma” scares the heck out of me and seems to be the perfect word to describe the bulging eyes, protruding stomach and overstuffed appearance of rockfish anglers reel up from deep water. Many of these fish are undersized and must, by law, be released.

Article Image
Capt. David Bacon (Ramona Lisa McFadyen photo)

A surprising percentage of released fish will equalize air bladder pressure after several minutes on the surface, swim back to the bottom and recuperate. Others float (hence called “floaters”) on the surface, dead, to become “bird bait” (much to the delight of gulls and pelicans). Floaters are wasteful and work against us in the process of fisheries management. Besides, most anglers are conservationists who only want to kill enough for the family dinner.

What can be done to reduce the number of floaters? The old school method was to use hypodermic needles or other needle-like devices to puncture swim bladders so fish could swim down on their own. Unfortunately, a few folks stuck the needle through the sac protruding from the fishes’ mouths. Big mistake. That is not the air bladder. It is the stomach. Many anglers never quite knew how to find the air bladder and therefore punctured other vital organs. Even when done properly, needles were not sterilized and the risk of infection was great. We needed a more fish-friendly method.

There has been considerable work done to come up with devices. Coastside Fishing Club came up with a device called a “Frankenator,’’ so named for founder Bob Franko. Entrepreneurial fisherfolk are working on various live fish release products. Most products are basically an inverted and weighted plastic crate with line attached. The best device has been an upside down weighted milk crate with 100 feet of light rope. That distance under the surface of the sea is relatively equal to the pressure of three atmospheres, which is sufficient to re-pressurize most fish’s air bladders so they can swim strongly back to the structure spots they call home.

With the help of Bill Hopper of West Marine in Santa Barbara, I have a device (see the nearby photo) aboard my charter boat WaveWalker, that is proving very effective. In fact, I have yet to see a fish float back to the surface after lowering it to 100 feet. The name I use is Deep Release Device, or DRD. My charter passengers have assigned it many comedic nicknames including my favorite, “fish elevator.’’ I am pleased to see more and more anglers working hard to let the little guys go healthy.

— Capt. David Bacon operates WaveWalker Charters and is president of SOFTIN Inc., a new nonprofit organization providing seafaring opportunities for those in need.

Support Noozhawk Today

You are an important ally in our mission to deliver clear, objective, high-quality professional news reporting for Santa Barbara, Goleta and the rest of Santa Barbara County. Join the Hawks Club today to help keep Noozhawk soaring.

We offer four membership levels: $5 a month, $10 a month, $25 a month or $1 a week. Payments can be made through PayPal below, or click here for information on recurring credit-card payments.

Thank you for your vital support.

Become a Supporter

Enter your email
Select your membership level
×

Payment Information

You are purchasing:

Payment Method

Pay by Credit Card:

Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Discover

Pay with Apple Pay or Google Pay:

Noozhawk partners with Stripe to provide secure invoicing and payments processing.

  • Ask
  • Vote
  • Investigate
  • Answer

Noozhawk Asks: What’s Your Question?

Welcome to Noozhawk Asks, a new feature in which you ask the questions, you help decide what Noozhawk investigates, and you work with us to find the answers.

Here’s how it works: You share your questions with us in the nearby box. In some cases, we may work with you to find the answers. In others, we may ask you to vote on your top choices to help us narrow the scope. And we’ll be regularly asking you for your feedback on a specific issue or topic.

We also expect to work together with the reader who asked the winning questions to find the answer together. Noozhawk’s objective is to come at questions from a place of curiosity and openness, and we believe a transparent collaboration is the key to achieve it.

The results of our investigation will be published here in this Noozhawk Asks section. Once or twice a month, we plan to do a review of what was asked and answered.

Thanks for asking!

Click Here to Get Started >

Reader Comments

Noozhawk is no longer accepting reader comments on our articles. Click here for the announcement. Readers are instead invited to submit letters to the editor by emailing them to [email protected]. Please provide your full name and community, as well as contact information for verification purposes only.

Daily Noozhawk

Subscribe to Noozhawk's A.M. Report, our free e-Bulletin sent out every day at 4:15 a.m. with Noozhawk's top stories, hand-picked by the editors.

Sign Up Now >