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Thursday, January 17 , 2019, 5:40 pm | Fog/Mist 59º

 
 
 
 

Ted Rall: How Society Makes Victimhood a No-Win Proposition

From Clarence Thomas to Jerry Sandusky to Bill Cosby to Harvey Weinstein, those who doubt their accusers always ask something similar to what Roy Moore said about those who accused him of sexual harassment and assault: "To think grown women would wait 40 years before a general election to bring charges is unbelievable."

What takes so long? Why don't alleged victims head straight to the police?

Shame and fear of disbelief.

I'm not referring to the well-documented victims' fear that they somehow brought the attack on themselves (for example, a woman who worries that she somehow sent mixed signals to a suitor who then raped her), but to something one rarely sees discussed in the media or talked about in typical conversations about victimhood.

Society doesn't like victims. Victims make us uncomfortable. It's probably a vestige of our Darwinian instinct for survival: the monkey clan prospers when its members are healthy and lucky, but finds life perilous around those who are sick and unfortunate.

We turn away from the unlucky: the homeless man, the woman whose face bears burn scars, the black guy getting choked to death by cops. Not our business, not our problem, these are troubles to be avoided. I do it too.

This instinct goes double for those who refuse to soft-pedal their victimhood. Not even the most active social justice warriors have Rose McGowan's back in her Twitter crusade against Harvey Weinstein — she's a bit too angry for comfort.

I am not judging humanity here. I am trying to answer Roy Moore et al's question. One of the answers is shame — the shame simply of being a victim in a shallow capitalist society that loves winners, hates losers and despises victims.

Fake it to make it has a corollary: Never let 'em see you sweat.

My friend  told me a bit of film theory, after a character in a movie gets maimed (loses a hand, gets shot and acts shot, getting weaker and visibly bleeding, whatever), the audience stops liking and identifying with him or her.

There are exceptions. Typically, however, a screenwriter will have a maimed character die, vanish or completely recover. Because no one likes a victim.

I grew up poor with my single mom and we were short of money. To bring in some cash, my mom hooked me up with a job helping the janitor wash the blackboards after school at my junior high school.

Looking back now, it was a situation perfect for an abuser: no one but an older male custodian and a 13-year-old boy in the otherwise empty building.

One afternoon the dude snuck behind me while I was working in a classroom and grabbed me, pinning my arms to my side. "Do you trust me?" he whispered in my ear. I remember his exact voice, the smell of his breath (alcohol, bourbon maybe). I felt his penis harden against my back.

I did not trust him.

But I told him I did, several times, and he believed me and let me go and I bounded exactly three steps toward the door, turned the knob and launched myself down the hall and flung myself down the stairs and hurled out the emergency exit, and I ran and ran and ran and it was so damn beautiful outside and I could hear the fire alarm ringing.

When my mom came home, I lied. I told her the job was over, the custodian no longer needed me.

Later a kid I didn't know approached me at school. He might have been a year older. He asked me if I had worked for the dirty old janitor and whether he'd gone after me because the same thing had happened to him.

I didn't ask if he'd gone to the principal or told his parents and he didn't ask me. It would have been the stupidest question in the world because no one would have believed us.

No one ever believed kids back then. About anything.

The school administration wouldn't have believed us about the English teacher who kept pot in his desk or the algebra teacher who seduced my friend or the driver's ed instructor who grabbed my classmate's breasts right in front of me and my best friend.

We Gen X kids understood the world as it was: survival was up to us. Adults didn't care; adults wouldn't help.

Decades later, when I told my mom that story, she admitted I was right.

"I assumed you were lazy," she said about my quitting the job.

If you've never been a victim of some kind, you may find this strange, but there is something worse than knowing (or suspecting) that you may not be believed, and that is coming forward and letting cops and courts and human resource officers decide for themselves, based on the evidence and their biases, whether they believe you or not.

As long as you keep your victimhood to yourself, you know your experience was real.

Ted Rall is the author of Bernie, a biography written with the cooperation of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. His next book, the graphic biography Trump, comes out July 19 and is now available for pre-order. Click here to contact him, and follow him on Twitter: @TedRall. Click here for previous columns. The opinions expressed are his own.

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