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Wednesday, March 20 , 2019, 3:04 am | Overcast 54º

 
 
 
 

Ted Rall: Trump, The Tape and a Bunch of Lazy Journalists

"The tape, without question, is real."

I expected better from The New York Times.

The quote is the lead of a news story by Daniel Victor, a reporter at the Times.

Victor's piece is about a controversy, or more precisely, an echo of a controversy: the 2005 "Access Hollywood" recording in which Donald Trump is heard joking with show host Billy Bush about grabbing women's genitals.

The audio (you don't see Trump's face during the gutter talk) was released shortly before a major debate against Hillary Clinton; it nearly cost Trump the election.

Perhaps in an effort to distance himself from the big sexual harassment discussion, Trump has lately been telling people that the audio wasn't real — that it wasn't him saying all that sexist stuff.

"We don't think that was my voice," he told a senator recently.

Trump's denial-come-lately (he apologized at the time) is being ridiculed.

"Mr. Trump's falsehoods about the 'Access Hollywood' tape are part of his lifelong habit of attempting to create and sell his own version of reality," Maggie Haberman and Jonathan Martin of the Times wrote.

Senator Jeff Flake said: "It's dangerous to democracy; you've got to have shared facts...that was your voice on that tape, you admitted it before."

Trump lies a lot. He may be lying here. I don't know.

The point is, neither does The New York Times.

What disturbs me more than the possibility/likelihood that the president is a liar is the fact that journalists who ought to know better, including six-figure reporters employed by prestigious media organizations like The New York Times that repeatedly brag about adhering to high standards, are too lazy and/or ignorant to conduct basic due diligence.

This isn't new: I have been the subject of news articles for which the news outlet didn't call me for comment (calling for comment is journalism 101). But journalistic laziness is still shocking and wrong.

A news article that begins with an unambiguous declarative statement like "The tape, without question, is real" ought to contain proof — or at least strong evidence — that there really is no question.

Victor's piece does not come close to meeting basic journalistic standards. Victor quotes a host from "Access Hollywood" who says that's Trump on the tape.

Mostly he relies on Trump's 2016 apology: "I said it, I was wrong, and I apologize."

But so what? I can say I was on the grassy knoll but that doesn't mean I really shot JFK. 

I don't like Trump, either. But it's reckless and irresponsible to report as news, as proven fact, something that you don't know for certain.

Editors and reporters at any newspaper, but especially one the size of the New York Times, which has considerable resources at its disposal, ought to know that proper reporting about audio or video requires both authentication and enhancement.

Proper forensic authentication of a recording like the "Access Hollywood" recording of Trump is a straightforward matter. First, you need both the original tape as well as the device with which it was made.

A copy or duplicate of an audio or video cannot be authenticated. The tape and recording device are analyzed by an expert in a sound studio for signs of splicing or other tampering. The identity of a speaker can never be 100 percent ascertained, but comparisons with known recordings of voices (as well as background noise from the original recording location) can provide meaningful indications as to whether a recording really is what and who it is purported to be. 

Do I believe Trump's denials? No. 

Is the media right to say Trump is lying about the Billy Bush recording? Also no. 

Because the media have offered no evidence as to the recording's authenticity.

For all we know, the original tape was never released. I'd be shocked if the recording device was released. And I'd be triple-shocked if those two items were sent to a professional audio expert for authentication.

A president who is an evil, dimwitted, under-qualified megalomaniac is a danger to democracy.

So is a lazy, cheap, cut-and-paste class of journalists who don't bother to thoroughly investigate stories.

Ted Rall is the author of Bernie, a biography written with the cooperation of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. His next book, the graphic biography Trump, comes out July 19 and is now available for pre-order. Click here to contact him, and follow him on Twitter: @TedRall. Click here for previous columns. The opinions expressed are his own.

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