Tuesday, April 24 , 2018, 10:36 pm | Overcast 54º

 
 
 
 

UCSB Engineer Fredrickson Wins William H. Walker Award

UCSB engineer Glenn Fredrickson has received the 2016 William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contributions to Chemical Engineering Literature from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Presented annually since 1936, the award is named for William H. Walker, one of the American pioneers of chemical engineering practice and principles.

“This major award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers recognizes Glenn Fredrickson’s immense and impactful contributions to the chemical engineering
literature, particularly with respect to polymer theory and simulations,” said Rachel Segalman, the Edward Noble Kramer Professor and chair of UCSB’s Department of
Chemical Engineering.

“We are incredibly proud of Glenn’s achievements and thrilled that they go so much further than the literature contributions recognized by this award to
contributions to UCSB, where he is an incredible colleague and a cornerstone of many exciting collaborations,” Segalman said.

Fredrickson’s computational field theory techniques have revolutionized the study of soft materials and complex fluids, most notably in self-assembling polymers and block
copolymers.

Known as field-theoretic simulations (FTS), these techniques are significant not only for their importance to molecular thermodynamics but also for their engineering impact on directed self-assembly — an emerging lithographic technology for semiconductor devices.

Companies such as Intel and Samsung are developing their next-generation lithographic processes based on FTS software tools developed by UCSB’s Fredrickson Research Group.

After contributing an influential 2002 article to the journal Macromolecules that explained the full framework of FTS, Frederickson, the Mitsubishi Chemical Chair in
Functional Materials at UCSB, four years later published the Oxford University Press monograph “The Equilibrium Theory of Inhomogeneous Polymers.”

The book, which unified the field of nonhomogeneous polymer theory and simulation, has become the standard reference for both self-consistent field theory and Frederickson’s more powerful FTS.

Frederickson earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida in 1980 and his master’s degree and doctorate from Stanford University in 1981 and 1984, respectively. He worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories before joining the faculty at UCSB in 1990.

In 2014, he was appointed chief technology officer and member of the board of Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings Corporation in Tokyo.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the AIChE, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

— Andrea Estrada and Julie Cohen for UCSB.

 
  • Ask
  • Vote
  • Investigate
  • Answer

Noozhawk Asks: What’s Your Question?

Welcome to Noozhawk Asks, a new feature in which you ask the questions, you help decide what Noozhawk investigates, and you work with us to find the answers.

Here’s how it works: You share your questions with us in the nearby box. In some cases, we may work with you to find the answers. In others, we may ask you to vote on your top choices to help us narrow the scope. And we’ll be regularly asking you for your feedback on a specific issue or topic.

We also expect to work together with the reader who asked the winning questions to find the answer together. Noozhawk’s objective is to come at questions from a place of curiosity and openness, and we believe a transparent collaboration is the key to achieve it.

The results of our investigation will be published here in this Noozhawk Asks section. Once or twice a month, we plan to do a review of what was asked and answered.

Thanks for asking!

Click Here to Get Started >

Support Noozhawk Today

You are an important ally in our mission to deliver clear, objective, high-quality professional news reporting for Santa Barbara, Goleta and the rest of Santa Barbara County. Join the Hawks Club today to help keep Noozhawk soaring.

We offer four membership levels: $5 a month, $10 a month, $25 a month or $1 a week. Payments can be made through PayPal below, or click here for information on recurring credit-card payments.

Thank you for your vital support.


Maestro, Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Discover, Debit

Reader Comments

Noozhawk is no longer accepting reader comments on our articles. Click here for the announcement. Readers are instead invited to submit letters to the editor by emailing them to [email protected]. Please provide your full name and community, as well as contact information for verification purposes only.

Daily Noozhawk

Subscribe to Noozhawk's A.M. Report, our free e-Bulletin sent out every day at 4:15 a.m. with Noozhawk's top stories, hand-picked by the editors.

Sign Up Now >