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The Assembly Line and American Labor

January 23, 2015 from 1:00pm - 3:00pm

David E. Nye (Center for American Studies, University of Southern Denmark)
 January 23, 2015 / 1:00 PM
HSSB 4041 (tentative location)

Since the creation of the assembly line in 1913, American workers have had a series of different response to it, as they struggled to obtain a fair share of the profits it made possible. This lecture – based on Nye’s 2013 book America’s Assembly Line – will focus on the automobile industry, from c. 1914 until the present. The talk will move from the initial enthusiasm for this new form of manufacturing to the disillusionment and labor struggles of the 1930s, successful unionization, and early efforts at automation. It will conclude with the more difficult years after c. 1975, when workers face three simultaneous problems: increasing use of robots, off-shore manufacturing, and the introduction of lean production.

David E. Nye is the author of more than 200 publications, including 8 books with MIT Press on the relationships between technology and American society. He received the Leonardo da Vince Medal for his life’s work, and was also knighted by the Queen of Denmark for his service to scholarship. He is professor of American Studies at the University of Southern Denmark, and a by-fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge University.

Sponsored by The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy and the IHC’s Machines, People, and Politics Research Focus Group.

• See more events sponsored by the IHC's Machines People and Politics RFG

 

Event Details

  • Organizer/Sponsor: The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy and the IHC’s Machines, People, and Politics Research Focus Group.
  • Starts: January 23, 2015 1:00pm - 3:00pm
  • Location: HSSB 4041 (tentative location) UCSB
  • Website: http://www.ihc.ucsb.edu/the-assembly-line/
  • Sponsors: The Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy and the IHC’s Machines, People, and Politics Research Focus Group.