A child suspected of having measles had laboratory tests return negative, the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department announced on Thursday.

The news comes just a day after the county announced it was investigating a possible case of the disease.

“The results are negative; the patient does not have measles,” according to a statement sent from Public Health. “We are happy for this patient and family and others who were potentially exposed.

“All will be notified directly and immediately released from any quarantine or isolation status.”

On Wednesday, a press conference was held to notify the public that the county was investigating a possible case of measles.

“We will continue to take seriously any request for measles testing from our community providers, although at this point the handful of children being tested have a very low likelihood of being positive,” the statement said.

The California Department of Public Health states that 50 of the 73 cases of measles that have been reported in the state are epidemiologically tied to an outbreak at Disneyland or Disney California Adventure Park in Anaheim.

Measles is a highly infectious, airborne disease that typically begins with fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes, and within a few days a red rash appears, usually first on the face and then spreading downward to the rest of the body, according to the CDPH.

Children are encouraged to get the vaccination as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and if a household contains a young child, “it is essential that others in the household get vaccinated to protect the young who are not old enough to have all recommended vaccinations,” according to Santa Barbara County Public Health.

Dr. Takashi Wada, director of the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department, told reporters Wednesday that in addition to measles, the state is in the midst of a whooping cough epidemic as well.

“These are serious illnesses, and a clear reminder of the importance of vaccinations,” he said.

Though the case is negative, public health officials urged the public to get vaccinated and wash their hands frequently to prevent the circulation of many of the viruses that are in the community.

People should reach out to their primary care physicians with their vaccination history, and those people can be advised about whether they need a booster or whether they are immune.

A phone line has also been set up by county Public Health to give out information on the measles during regular business hours and can be reached at 805.681.4373.

Noozhawk staff writer Lara Cooper can be reached at lcooper@noozhawk.com. Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

Lara Cooper, Noozhawk Staff Writer | @laraanncooper

— Noozhawk staff writer Lara Cooper can be reached at lcooper@noozhawk.com. Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.